Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me

Create an account

Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required.
Name *
Username *
Password *
Verify password *
Email *
Verify email *
Captcha *
Reload Captcha

Meaning of Nana Addo’s yellow outfit at Yaa-Naa’s swearing-in explained Featured

President Akufo-Addo has been trending on social media over his outfit to the coronation of the new overlord of Dagbon on Friday.

The coronation of Yaa-Naa Abukari Mahama II after nearly two decades of conflict over the rightful heir to the skin, saw Ghanaians from all walks of life beautifully dressed and cheerfully participate in the historic event.

While there were more than enough memorable sights and scenes from the event, President Akufo-Addo’s unusual attire, appears to be the one that caught the attention of most Ghanaians.

Akufo-Addo was dressed in a yellow handwoven smock with traditional northern trousers as a typical Takai dance outfit for the grand ceremony.

Underlying the yellow and leather boots was a strong message to the people of Dagbon in the Northern Region.
Akufo-Addo’s outfit was one typically worn by Takai dancers.
The pair of trousers is traditionally known as Kurugu.

Kurugu is sewn from several yards of fugu (smock) that reaches the ankle and comes out bulky in nature.

The design of the Kurugu naturally gathers around the thighs of anyone who wears it.

The long leather boots are traditionally known as Mugri. Mugri is a natural match to the Kurugu which is tucked into the boots.

The Kurugu, mugri and handwoven smock to match, are typically worn by royals or persons with high reputation in society, but can also be worn by anyone who can afford it. It is worn during festive occasions including the Damba festival.

Anyone in such attire is considered correctly dressed for the festive occasion, so it was just perfect for President Akufo-Addo to attend the inauguration dressed in it.

On the colour, some locals say yellow signifies peace, something most desired for the Dagbon kingdom after years of unrest.

Indeed, the attire in itself reminds Dagbon people of the need for peace as the Takai dance, done typically in the Kurugu, handwoven smock and mugri, flows with a drum rhythm whose language simply says, “the chief says listen, stop the fight.”

---

Source: citinewsonline

Rate this item
(0 votes)

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

Advertisement

Presby Mega Revival

Facebook Page

Latest Tweets

Planned IMF exit causing investors to hold back funds as cedi suffers – Economist - Frontpage Ghana… https://t.co/HRVhncXWtl
NDC 'hurt, disappointed' Kwabena Adjei with monecracy, loss of values – Rawlings - Frontpage Ghana… https://t.co/T4oO4L80kC
GCB sacks 164 former UT, Capital banks staff over WASSCE, SSSCE results - Frontpage Ghana https://t.co/WDMsloATLs via @tripplesworld
Follow Front Page Ghana on Twitter

Post Gallery

NDC 'hurt, disappointed' Kwabena Adjei with monecracy, loss of values – Rawlings

GCB sacks 164 former UT, Capital banks staff over WASSCE, SSSCE results

Planned IMF exit causing investors to hold back funds as cedi suffers – Economist

Farmer, 38, commits suicide by drinking weedicide

Black Stars not denied access to Tang Palace- Normalisation Committee

Waste management companies score below average in latest AMA report

Man jailed five years for attacking 102-year-old woman

We’re ensuring maximum security in Chereponi – Police

NPP used and disgraced me like a child in parliament - Kennedy Agyapong weeps